It’s O.K. to mess up. We all do.

It’s O.K. to mess up. We all do.
It’s O.K. to mess up. We all do.

Each year, almost two million people in the United States graduate from college. What comes next can be intimidating: finding a job, learning to cook, realizing how bad credit card debt can get. This is a guide for a graduate’s first years of freedom. Some of these stories are about the basic realities of career and personal finance. Others are about creating the life you’ve always imagined — or may just be beginning to imagine — and bouncing back when things don’t go right.

Roth I.R.A.

Student Loan Deferment

Student Loan Consolidation

401(k)

Deductible

Index Fund

H.M.O.

P.P.O.

E.T.F.

Credit Score

Credit Report

Income-based Repayment

Credit Freeze

Compound Interest

Roth I.R.A.

A retirement account that’s often a great option for younger people with less income, particularly if their employers don’t offer anything. Here’s why: You contribute money that has already been taxed as part of your paycheck — and since younger people tend to earn less, they pay less in taxes on what they make. But the best part is that you don’t pay taxes later when you withdraw money for retirement. Federal rules on how much you can contribute are here.

Design and production by Gray Beltran, Jessie Schwartz and Eden Weingart.

More on NYTimes.com
Site Information Navigation Site Information Navigation

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV EU's Juncker says did not mean to offend May
NEXT Ex-Dallas police officer Amber Guyger indicted in murder of Botham Jean by grand jury